The Art of Lying in Men and Women

Lying has received a bad reputation but it is actually one of the biggest accomplishments of our brain. For starters, we have to juggle multiple pieces of information and different perspectives. The Prefrontal Cortex (the executive part of the brain) does the heavy lifting when you are lying. In my research, I found that children who are good liars, are smarter than those who have trouble telling a convincing lie.

There is also a difference between men and women. A study found that men took longer when they lied about their personal information compared to when they lied about general information; and they also have more PFC activation. For women, there were no differences in their brain activation or response time when they lied about personal and general information.

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study shows coloring improves memory, reduces stress for veterans

UNF study shows coloring improves memory, reduces stress for veterans

Simple activities, such as drawing and coloring, may yield both mental health and cognitive benefits for veterans, according to a new study conducted by Dr. Tracy Alloway, associate professor of psychology at the University of North Florida.The study, in collaboration with UNF psychology graduate student Jourdan Rodak and psychology undergraduate student Michaela Rizzo, explored the use of coloring and drawing in veterans with and without self-reported Post Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms.

My Study Reveals Coloring Improves Working Memory/Reduces Stress Among Veterans

Simple activities, such as drawing and coloring, may yield both mental health and cognitive benefits for veterans. In my research, I found that:

1) Veterans showed decreased self-reported anxiety and stress after coloring a mandala—a geometric pattern—for 20 minutes

2) Veterans also showed improved working memory after drawing for 20 minutes.

Coloring can reduce stress and anxiety and improve memory in veterans

Study reveals coloring improves working memory/reduces stress among veterans

Simple activities, such as drawing and coloring, may yield both mental health and cognitive benefits for veterans, according to a new study conducted by Dr. Tracy Alloway, associate professor of psychology at the University of North Florida. The study, in collaboration with UNF psychology graduate...